Everything You Need to Know About a Plant-Based Paleo Diet

May 28, 2019 0 Comments

Everything You Need to Know About a Plant-Based Paleo Diet

 

If you’ve been trying to get into shape lately, there’s a good chance that you’ve heard rumblings about going plant-based paleo. If a plant-based paleo diet is new to you, you probably have questions about whether or not it will meet your dietary needs, help you feel healthier, and satisfy you and your family. This beginner’s guide to a plant-based paleo diet will tell you everything you need to know about going plant-based paleo, from what that means to how to do it in a healthy way while ensuring you get all the vitamins, minerals, and proteins that you need to live your healthiest life. We’ll also offer some tips and tricks for meal planning on a plant-based paleo diet, as well as links to some recipes you and your family will love. So, buckle in; it’s going to be a fun ride!

What is a Plant-Based Paleo Diet?

Of course, the first thing you want to know if a plant-based paleo diet is new to you, is what, exactly, is a plant-based paleo diet. Let’s break this down!

What does it mean to eat a plant-based diet?

A plant-based diet is just what it sounds like: a diet that is made up of plants. This includes fresh fruits and vegetables, hearty grains, nuts, legumes, and healthy fats. This is a turn away from traditional diets today, which not only tend to include meat and fish, but often use these animals products as the centerpiece to meals. There’s a lot of evidence to support why eating a plant-based diet is actually healthier for your body, which we’ll get into later. Eating a plant-based diet is also better for animals, who are often raised in inhumane ways in order to produce the quantities of meat we eat every day, and it’s better for the environment.

What is a Paleo Diet?

The Paleo diet encourages you to go back to the basics and eat natural, whole foods just like our ancestors did in the era of hunter-gatherers. It focuses on eating natural, organic, and real food that is consumable with little to no processing at all. Hence, the Paleo diet focuses on eating the way nature intended us to eat.

Proponents of this diet believe that if you adjust your eating style to that of our Paleolithic forefathers, your body will reset to its natural biological function, improving digestion and health.

While humans ate like this for millennia, recent books like The Paleo Solution by Robb Wolf and The Primal Blueprint by Mark Sisson have caused a spike of interest and attention from people to go back to the basics when it comes to nutrition and a healthy diet. These books, and the success experienced by people around the world, are widely regarded as the reasons for the Paleo diet’s popularity today.

How did the Paleo diet begin?

In order to know how the Paleo diet even came to be, we need to trace back to our ancestral roots. During the time of hunters and gatherers, food choices were limited to primarily meat and other sources of protein.

In fact, did you know that eating grains is a relatively new concept? While rice and other forms of grains may seem to be one of the staple foods in our meals, humans only started consuming grains –particularly rice--as a source of carbohydrates during the Agricultural Revolution, which occurred about 10,000 years ago.

Not only that, studies found out that humans during the Paleolithic era does not eat as much sugar as humans today consume. It is also a myth that humans need sugar in order to have energy to move and function. If our ancestors didn’t need energy from sugar to run around and fight wild animals, we certainly don’t need it to sit on the couch and watch Netflix.

Ultimately, the Paleo diet is going back to our roots and paying homage to eating like we used to.

Top 10 Similarities Between a Plant-Based Diet and a Paleo Diet 

1.) No Refined Foods

 Processed foods result in many health issues; therefore, both the plant-based and Paleo diet restrict their consumption. Refined foods such as soft drinks, oils, and sugars have a high content of sodium, corn syrup, hydrogenated oils and saturated fats; these are ingredients people should evade.

All these ingredients have detrimental effects on your health and can cause common diseases such as diabetes, heart attacks, strokes, and cancers. Both Paleo and plant-based diets avoid refined foods due to the numerous adverse health problems.

2.) Emphasis on Greens

Both diets emphasize eating a significant amount of green leafy vegetables, for good reasons. Green vegetables are among the healthiest superfoods that you can eat.  These vegetables are full of nutrients that help you to have a healthy body.

In Paleo, vegetables are set as salads or side dish food accompanying the main meal. Similarly, the plant-based diet related to the vegan diet incorporates green vegetables in smoothies and also consumes them as salads.

 3.) Eliminate Dairy

Dairy elimination is one of the most apparent similarities between the plant-based and Paleo diet. The scientific reason behind avoiding milk is because whey and casein proteins in milk are difficult to digest, and are also allergenic.

Many people are not able to produce lactase, the enzyme required to digest milk, hence making it impossible for them to digest milk lactose.

Additionally dairy is acid-forming, which makes it problematic for the body to maintain the required ph. A plant-based protein can offer a natural healthy alternative to dairy products.

4.) Reduce Acidity

Eating dairy and processed animal product foods can increase the blood’s acidic content. For the neutralization of acid levels, the body will take calcium from the bones. This may cause bone density problems which will make your bones weak and fragile.

To combat the problem both plant-based and Paleo followers achieve pH balance by eating alkaline vegetables and fruits. However, the plant-based diet goes further by eliminating animal products that may form acid in the body.

5.) High Fiber Content

Foods and vegetables allowed in both diets have high fiber content. Vital fibers assist in digestion health; improve the flow of blood to the colon and the ability to absorb essential minerals and nutrients. Fiber is vital in loss of weight since it helps you to feel fuller for an extended period.

6.) Phytic Acid Reduction

Phytic acid is a mineral binding antioxidant compound, which makes it problematic for the intestines to absorb vital minerals. The acid is usually present in seeds, legumes, nuts, and grains. The diets have seeds and nuts, but the plant-based diet also consists of legumes.

Both diets try to eliminate phytic acid by reducing the consumption level of seeds and nuts. The acid level is also reduced by soaking nuts and seeds overnight.

7.) Seeds

Paleo and plant-based include seeds in their diets. They contain seeds such as sunflower, sesame, hemp and chia seeds, termed as superfoods. Some of them help in loss of weight and have high omega-3 content. They also improve digestive health and reduce inflammation. These benefits make both diets very healthy.

8.) Nuts

Nuts such as almond, walnuts and cashew nuts, are rich in calcium, minerals, vitamins and numerous plant-based proteins. Paleo and plant-based followers include nuts in their diet for a healthier life.  Peanuts are not nuts.

Mineral, calcium, and vitamins help in bone health. While other nutrients, assist in brain health and blood pressure regulation.

9.) No Refined Sugars

Sugar is a term that describes different types of carbohydrates, which can be complex or simple. The health effects of sugar vary depending on the type you are consuming, natural or refined.

Dairy products such as cheese, milk and natural yogurt are sources of good sugars such as fructose, broken down in the body to glucose. Sugar cane and sugar beets are concocted to extract sucrose, made of glucose and fructose. These chemically produced sugars are added to soft drinks, yogurt, sweets to add flavor.

Refined sugar offers no nutritional value for the body; instead, it spikes insulin production and blood sugar. When seeking alternative sources, avoid fruit juices, instead consume fruits in their entirety because the fibers prevent the sugars from being digested quickly.

10.) Low Sodium

Both diets advocate using less table salt to lower your blood pressure and decrease the risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, athletes must maintain a moderate salt intake to replace salt lost through sweating. People on both diets are encouraged to balance their sodium intake by also eating foods rich in potassium found in vegetables, meats, and fruits.

Which Diet Is the Best?

A hybrid Plant-based Paleo diet with no added sugar can be a great approach to living. Both diets are tolerable and share numerous similarities; thus, it makes sense to combine them for optimum health.   Amrita Bars that are plant-based are also paleo.

The most valuable point is to keep off refined sugar, which is poisonous and lethal for the body. For a vegan, you can try the plant-based without grains as recommended by the Paleo diet.

So, what is a Plant-Based Paleo Diet?

true paleo is plant-based

A plant-based paleo diet takes the best parts of a plant-based diet and combines them with the best parts of a paleo diet to create a diet that mimics what our early ancestors would have eaten while being conscientious of the environment and the humane treatment of animals. This diet:

Includes:

  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Nuts & Seeds
  • Healthy Fats & Oils
  • Herbs & Spices

Avoids:

  • Meat & Fish
  • Processed Foods
  • Artificial Sweeteners
  • Grains
  • Dairy Products

The best thing about a plant-based paleo diet is that it’s a lifestyle choice, not a strict diet, which means that there’s no calorie counting involved. Once you learn some recipes that you and your family enjoy on a plant-based paleo diet, it’s easy to keep on the diet without even thinking about it most days.  

Why Plant-based Paleo?

Nutritionists and dieticians continue to study the effects of Paleo diet to humans. Nutritional anthropologists have been estimating the nutrient intakes of our ancestors for several decades. Their research found that a true Paleolithic diet, is much closer in nutrients to a vegan or plant-based diet than what many people promote as a Paleo diet.

The aim of a Paleo diet is to return to a way of eating that's more like what early humans ate. The diet's reasoning is that the human body is genetically mismatched to the modern diet that emerged with farming practices. This is an idea explored by many nutritionist and dieticians today as it grows more popular not only within celebrities, but with ordinary people who want to shed off some pounds and be healthy as well.

In fact, many studies have already looked into it and researched on how it benefits the human body through weight loss, among other things. There has been a lot of literature that have been published that present evidences on how advantageous Paleo diet is for one’s health in general.

One study had 14 medical students follow a strict Paleo diet for three weeks. All of them have lost 5.1 pounds (2.3kgs) and have reduced their waist circumference by 0.6 inches. Some even claim that Paleo diet is more effective for weight loss compared to other fads which suggests fewer caloric intake throughout the program.

Another study involving 70 obese women aged 60 and above turned out to benefit from the Paleo diet. They were divided into two groups—one to follow a high-fiber diet for 2 years, while the other follows a Paleo diet with the same time frame. The results revealed that the women on the Paleo diet have lost 2.5 times more weight only six months into the study, and two times more after another 6 months. By the completion of the study, both groups have regained some weight, but those who followed the Paleo diet still shed 1.6 times more all in all.

Paleo diet is also arguably fitting for those who have type 2 Diabetes. A study observed 13 people who followed a Paleo diet, and another group who observed a diet for Diabetic patients, which allows them to consume low fat and moderate to higher carb foods. After two consecutive three-month periods, the study found that those on the Paleo diet lost 6.6 pounds (3 kgs) and 1.6 inches (4 cm) more from their waistlines than those on the diabetes diet.

However, some experts have argued that the underlying hypothesis of the diet may oversimplify the story of how humans adapted to the changes in their diet. Some argue that different diet options and conditions from various geographical location, climate, and food availability should also be factored in. Moreover, in the archaeological point of view, some recorded data shows that early human diets included grains in their food intake, dating as early as 30,000 years ago—even before the Agricultural revolution. Genetics is also an aspect to be explored, since there were notable evolutionary changes continued even after the Paleolithic era, including diet-related changes such as the number of genes humans have when it comes to breaking down dietary starches.

Since the Paleo diet is relatively new, more researches are still needed to be done to know more about its long term effects to the body.

Body Changes on Plant-Based Paleo

Upon embracing the Paleo diet and lifestyle, your body will undergo positive changes. Unlike other fads and trendy diets, Paleo does not only promise weight loss, but other advantages for your overall health. This is because sticking to foods that are naturally available in your own environment allows your body to thrive, becoming stronger, leaner and less likely to battle modern-day health concerns.

Muscle Build up and Weight Loss

Eating purely protein and fats, you will feel full and satisfied faster without having to eat too much while maintaining your body’s nutritional needs. This way, you will feel energized with the help of the fat stored in your body, burning it, and aiding in weight loss.

Improved digestion

Paleo foods will help in healing the gut and it will support the regrowth of healthy, digestion-aiding bacteria. This diet encourages the consumption of foods like leafy greens, bone broth and fermented foods that effectively reduce inflammation, relieve gassiness, and aid digestion.

Regulated hormones

Hormones affect many more aspects of your life than you imagine. From weight, metabolism, energy levels, to your ability to sleep—and even fertility, regulating hormones should be a priority in health.

Thanks to Paleo’s recommendation of eating nutrient-dense foods, the body can balance hormone levels naturally while eliminating toxins which affect your hormones, too.

Reduced inflammation

Inflammation is caused by the body’s attempt at self-protection which can be triggered by processed foods and environmental toxins. In severe cases, it can lead to arthritis, swollen and stiff joints, fatigue or muscular pain. Paleo diet includes eating foods rich in omega-3s and raw vegetables, nuts and seeds, reducing the chances of inflammation.

Stronger bones

Beef, bone broth, wild-caught fish, leafy greens and other proteins combined with vegetables like broccoli, Brussels sprouts and cauliflower promote the building of stronger bones in the body. Most Paleo foods are rich in vitamin K, calcium and magnesium in your diet, which are all vital for bone health.

Increased energy levels

Organic protein provides the body with B vitamins and iron, helping to boost your energy levels and physical endurance.

More beautiful, glowing skin

A paleo lifestyle eliminates triggers that may lead to breakouts, such as dairy, gluten or even chemicals from processed foods and cosmetics. Paleo also includes foods that are high in vitamins A, E and zinc which are all part of the recipe for a healthier, more beautiful skin.

Healthier hair and Stronger nails

Dry, brittle hair can often be the result of a nutrient deficiency. By eating paleo foods, you are boosting your zinc, iron and biotin intake, which may lead to thicker and shinier hair. Just like hair, Paleo foods also improve the quality of your nails as you eat biotin-rich foods like eggs, salmon, liver and avocado.

Paleo Myths debunked

Like anything new, people tend to be wary of the paleo diet when they first hear about it. As a result, a number of myths about the paleo diet have cropped up. Here are some of the most common paleo myths, debunked. 

Paleo is expensive

Since this diet is popular amongst celebrities, many speculate that Paleo diet is expensive and is not sustainable for average earners. In fact, a recent study has supported that the Paleo diet is feasible even by following the USDA’s thrifty food plan. This food and diet guide was curated by a group of nutritionists, dieticians, and food experts which lists down the best food choices that provides the most nutrients and vitamins that are worthy of its price.

Since the food prescribed by the Paleo diet are organic, natural, and fresh, its practitioners will not have a hard time buying fresh produce, especially if they are directly from the markets where local farmers sell their products. You may even be surprised to find out that Paleo’s food recommendations cost less than the prices of some fast food meals.

You don’t get enough calcium

Unlike the popular belief that there would be insufficient calcium in the body because of the removal of dairy from the diet, people who practice the Paleo diet may still get their calcium supply from green vegetables which is about 75 mg per one cooked serving.

You starve from small portions

Some diets require you to count calories, Paleo diet challenges people to get their daily caloric needs from vegetables and other healthy options.

Goodbye normal food

One of the most common misconceptions about Paleo diet is that it restricts its practitioners when it comes to food choices and options. However, the truth is that the Paleo diet lets you have a variety of food. Nutritionists suggest the 85:15 rule wherein people follow Paleo 85 % of the time and 15 % of the time they may stray from Paleo diet rules and still achieve real improvements in health. The 85% rule lets you have your favorite snack once a week at most. Its focus is all about diversifying your diet instead of limiting it.

Your lifespan shortens

Unlike the Paleolithic era when a saber-tooth tiger can attack and kill you (hence, shortening your lifespan), following the Paleo diet will actually make your life longer because it lowers the risk of you getting cancer, diabetes, obesity, and other lifestyle-related diseases many humans develop in this time and age.

Why does the Paleo diet work?

The aim of a Paleo diet is to return to a way of eating that's more like what early humans ate. The diet's reasoning is that the human body is genetically mismatched to the modern diet that emerged with farming practices. This is an idea explored by many nutritionist and dieticians today as it grows more popular not only within celebrities, but with ordinary people who want to shed off some pounds and be healthy as well.

In fact, many studies have already looked into it and researched on how it benefits the human body through weight loss, among other things. There has been a lot of literature that have been published that present evidences on how advantageous Paleo diet is for one’s health in general.

One study had 14 medical students follow a strict Paleo diet for three weeks. All of them have lost 5.1 pounds (2.3kgs) and have reduced their waist circumference by 0.6 inches. Some even claim that Paleo diet is more effective for weight loss compared to other fads which suggests fewer caloric intake throughout the program.

Another study involving 70 obese women aged 60 and above turned out to benefit from the Paleo diet. They were divided into two groups—one to follow a high-fiber diet for 2 years, while the other follows a Paleo diet with the same time frame. The results revealed that the women on the Paleo diet have lost 2.5 times more weight only six months into the study, and two times more after another 6 months. By the completion of the study, both groups have regained some weight, but those who followed the Paleo diet still shed 1.6 times more all in all.

Paleo diet is also arguably fitting for those who have type 2 Diabetes. A study observed 13 people who followed a Paleo diet, and another group who observed a diet for Diabetic patients, which allows them to consume low fat and moderate to higher carb foods. After two consecutive three-month periods, the study found that those on the Paleo diet lost 6.6 pounds (3 kgs) and 1.6 inches (4 cm) more from their waistlines than those on the diabetes diet.

However, some experts have argued that the underlying hypothesis of the diet may oversimplify the story of how humans adapted to the changes in their diet. Some argue that different diet options and conditions from various geographical location, climate, and food availability should also be factored in. Moreover, in the archaeological point of view, some recorded data shows that early human diets included grains in their food intake, dating as early as 30,000 years ago—even before the Agricultural revolution. Genetics is also an aspect to be explored, since there were notable evolutionary changes continued even after the Paleolithic era, including diet-related changes such as the number of genes humans have when it comes to breaking down dietary starches.

Since the Paleo diet is relatively new, more researches are still needed to be done to know more about its long term effects to the body.

How to Go Plant-Based Paleo

Now that you understand why going plant-based paleo is a good choice for you both ethically and medically, let’s talk about how to make the transition to a plant-based paleo diet.

If you’ve been eating a typical American diet filled with pasta, bread, and meat, it may be tough to transition to a plant-based paleo diet. The first thing you’ll want to do is source a bunch of different plant-based paleo recipes and try them one at a time. As a family, determine which recipes taste good to you, which recipes keep you full over time, and which recipes you can cook quickly enough to fit into your lifestyle. These are the recipes you’ll want to hold onto. As you continue this journey, you can learn which foods and recipes to rely on that work with your family.

Another thing to consider is snacking more often now that you’re eating healthier. Keeping fresh fruits and vegetables on hand to eat as snacks can keep your hunger at bay and prevent you from eating unhealthy foods impulsively. Snacks like our paleo bites can also help you curb your sweet tooth while staying on track. Tips to make it easier to snack healthfully include:

  • Keep your healthiest snacks at eye level in your fridge and cupboards to make them easier to grab
  • Prepare healthy snacks like chopped veggies at the beginning of the week so that you can grab them when you want them
  • Buy healthy snacks that you actually enjoy the taste of so that healthy snacking doesn’t feel like a chore

The other important thing to consider when going plant-based paleo is to eat a variety of foods. Eating a variety of foods, rather than eating the same thing day after day, will ensure you get the full range of vitamins and minerals that your body needs.

 

Why Fat is not Bad?

For the longest time, fats have been receiving a lot of backlash when it comes to diet and eating healthy. When people hear or read the word fat on the nutritional contents of a food, they automatically associate it with heart disease, a cause of hypertension, or even something useless for the body.

However, nutritionists remind us that a diet also needs fats to be considered a balanced one. It might be news to you, but not all fats are created equal--some fats are bad, and some fats actually promote good health. The key is knowing the difference of each so you can determine which ones to avoid and consume in moderation.

Fat is as essential to your diet as protein and carbohydrates are in fueling your body with energy. Certain bodily functions also rely on the presence of fat, and without it, your body will not function normally or to its full capacity.

The Good Fat vs The Bad Fat

The bad kind of fat: Trans fat and Saturated fat

The bad kind of fat are identified as harmful to your health. There are two types of bad fat: saturated fat and trans fat. Their most common identifier is that these types of fats are solid at room temperature, such as:

  • Butter
  • Margarine
  • Shortening
  • beef or pork fat

Trans fat should be avoided while saturated fats should be eaten very sparingly.
Saturated fat, on the other hand can be consumed sparingly. Most saturated fats are animal fats. They’re found in high-fat meats and dairy products.

Saturated fat sources include:

  • fatty cuts of beef, pork, and lamb
  • dark chicken meat and poultry skin
  • high-fat dairy foods (whole milk, butter, cheese, sour cream, ice cream)
  • tropical oils (coconut oil, palm oil, cocoa butter)
  • Lard

Newer studies have recently argued that saturated fat may not be as bad as traditional doctors thought it would be. According to Harvard University, researchers now think saturated fat may not be as bad as once thought — but it still isn’t the best choice for fats.

The good kind of fat: Monounsaturated fat

This type of helpful fat is present in a variety of foods and oils. Research has consistently shown that eating foods that contain monounsaturated fat can improve your blood cholesterol level and decrease your risk of cardiovascular diseases. These foods include:

  • nuts (almonds, cashews, peanuts, pecans)
  • vegetable oils (olive oil, peanut oil)
  • almond butter
  • avocado

The best kind of fat: Polyunsaturated fat

Polyunsaturated fats can actually reduce a person’s risk for heart disease, a study by The Cochrane Review discovered. While the risk reduction is low, these differences could make a difference to a person’s health.

You can find polyunsaturated fat in the following foods, which contain omega-6 fatty acids:

  • tofu
  • roasted soybeans and soy nut butter
  • walnuts
  • seeds (sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds)
  • vegetable oils (corn oil, safflower oil, sesame oil, sunflower oil)
  • soft margarine (liquid or tub)

They are also known as “essential fats” because the body could not produce them naturally, hence, they are needed to be supplied to the body from foods. The primary source of polyunsaturated fat are plant-based foods. These healthy fats to not only decrease the risk of coronary artery disease, but also help lower blood pressure levels and guard against irregular heartbeats. You can get omega 3 from:

  • Walnuts
  • Flaxseed
  • Chia seeds
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Algal oil
  • Hemp seed
  • Perilla oil

Healthier fats are an important part of your diet, but it’s still crucial to moderate your consumption of them because all fats are high in calories. It would always be best to incorporate foods that contain monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats into your diet, which will greatly help your heart and improve your quality of life.

How to Get Enough Protein on a Plant-Based Paleo Diet

In order to get enough protein on a plant-based paleo diet, you need to rethink your definition of protein. In the past, protein may have translated in your mind to mean to meat or fish. Now, learn to translate it to think of seeds, nuts, and high-protein foods like peas or mushrooms. Making sure that each meal you consume has some of these items in it will ensure that you’re getting all the protein you need. Again, the key here is to consume a variety of different proteins throughout your day and throughout your week. This is the best way to ensure your body is getting everything it needs from you.

 

Week-long plant-based Paleo Recipe Guide

Breakfast

(Choose One Daily)

Option 1: 1/2 cup whole-grain cereal or cooked oatmeal; 1 cup plant-based milk or yogurt (such as almond milk, soy milk, or coconut yogurt); Unlimited fruit

Option 2: 1 slice whole-grain toast with 2 Tbsp. dairy-free cream cheese, unlimited fruit

Option 3: Veggie Scramble (1-2 vegan eggs or egg yolks) with spinach, mushrooms and yellow squash in coconut oil, Handful fresh berries

Option 4: Green Smoothie (coconut milk, grass-fed beef protein, 1/2 banana, 1/2 avocado)

Option 5: Pumpkin Muffin, Body Boosting Tea (chai tea + 1 tbsp. MCT oil + collagen peptides + cinnamon + vanilla)

Lunch

(Choose One Daily)

Option 1: 1 cup black bean soup; unlimited sliced veggies; 1/4 avocado; 15 baked corn chips

Option 2: Lettuce and chopped veggies, 1/2 cup beans and 1/2 cup corn kernels, 1 Tbsp. olive oil and vinegar and seasonings

Option 3: 8 pieces brown-rice sushi with all-vegetable filling; soy sauce; 1/2 cup edamame; 1 oz. almonds; 1 orange

Option 4: Harissa Portobello Mushroom Tacos

Option 5: Cilantro lime cauliflower bowls

Dinner

(Choose One Daily)

Option 1: Roasted Cauliflower Steaks with Paprika Cashew Cream

Option 2: 3 oz. 1 small baked sweet potato or 1/2 cup cooked corn, 1/2 Tbsp. olive oil, Unlimited vegetables

Option 3: Green Goddess Fig Nourish Bowls

Option 4: Butternut squash + coconut milk soup with ground “meat free” ground beef , Spinach salad with oil & vinegar

Option 5: Spaghetti Squash with Avocado Basil Pesto, Roasted Broccoli with Nutritional Yeast

Snack

(Choose One Daily)

Option 1: 1/2 cup roasted chickpeas; 1 slice whole-grain toast, drizzle honey; Unlimited fruit

Option 2: 1 serving Vegan Avocado Ice Cream

Dessert

(Enjoy Twice Per Week)

Option 1: 1 palm-sized serving any non-dairy dessert  one pack of Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups

Bonus: High-Protein Paleo Recipe Under $6

Ingredients and cost 

With this recipe, you'll enjoy 56 grams of plant-based protein for $6, along with fiber, nutrients, and healthy fats.                                       

  • Tofu : $2 (protein 15g)
  • Chickpeas can  $0.55 (protein 15g)
  • Pumpkin seeds (toasted) : 1/4 cup $0.5  (protein 10g)
  • Sunflower seeds (toasted / salted) : 1/4 cup $0.5  (protein 8g)
  • Guacamole or avocado :  1 cup $1  (protein 4g)
  • Fresh baby tomato: 2 cups $0.5 (protein 4g)
  • Herbs like cilantro, handful  $0.5
  • Onions to saute with tofu $0.25 

Procedure:

  1. Saute tofu in a tiny bit of coconut oil . add in onions and spices (i always add siracha sauce)

  2. Create bed with herbs (or lettuce) .. add in chopped veggies

  1. Add Tofu, Guacamole and enjoy!  It's a large salad and can travel quite well!